Eliane Consalvo - LAER Realty Partners



Posted by Eliane Consalvo on 9/17/2017

Cooking with fresh herbs is infinitely better than using the dried out flakes you'll find at the grocery store. Not only are they packed with much more flavor, but they'll also save you money in the process. Sure, there are some herbs you probably won't use very often and should just keep a small jar of them in your pantry. However, certain herbs are so useful that it's worth having on your window sill to pick from when you need them. If you're thinking about starting an indoor or outdoor herb garden, here are the best herbs to put in it that will spice up your recipes and save you money at the checkout line.

Basil

Number one on our list is sweet basil. Basil can be chopped up into sauces and salads, or it can be used whole on pizzas and sandwiches. For a great snack, toss some olive oil with chunks of tomato, mozzarella, and chopped basil. It's the perfect combination of tangy, sweet, and refreshing. Basil is also great for making tea and has a strong and pleasant aroma. If you start running low, you can start a new plant with clippings from an old one. As you pick from the plant, be sure to remove the leaf node (the stem part of the leaf) fully so your plant keeps producing more leaves.

Parsley

A good herb to pair with basil is parsley. It goes great with pasta dishes, sauce, pizza, or eggs. Like basil, parsley can be harvested as needed. Simply cut the outermost leaves for use and leave the inner leaves to mature. However, parsley is also easy to dry and store. To dry parsley, hang it up in a warm place that has plenty of shade and ventilation. Test it by seeing if it crumbles in your hand. Once it does, crumble the rest up and store it in an air tight jar.

Thyme

Arguably one of the the prettiest herbs on the list, thyme fills its long stems with small flowers and fills the air with a pleasant scent. Thyme goes well with many vegetables and types of seafood and is also common in many teas. If you live in a temperate climate, you could also try growing some thyme as an ornamental and aromatic shrub in your yard.

Mint

As you would suspect, mint smells and tastes...minty. To impress everyone at your summer cookout, place some mint leaves from your garden into their ice cold drinks. Like many other items on the list, mint is also great in tea and can be paired up with basil, lavender, and many other herbs to make a great herbal tea concoction.

Lavender

Lavender is another pretty flowering herb. However, due to its size, it's best grown outdoors. You can make several homemade items from lavender including soaps, fragrance sprays, tea, and more. However, be sure to read up on caring for lavender plants as they require a lot of sunlight and well-drained soil. To make use of its size and aesthetics outside, you can plant lavender along walkways in your yard or garden.




Tags: home   gardening   garden   mint   herbs   herb   herb garden   basil   parsley   thyme   lavender  
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Posted by Eliane Consalvo on 11/8/2015

The weather is getting cooler but that means it is time to start thinking about spring. Bulbs planted this fall, will bloom starting in early spring.  Some of the most popular bulbs that flower in the spring include tulips and daffodils. Planting bulbs is easy and perfect for the beginner gardener. Here are some tips to get you started: 1. Plant in the fall or early winter before the ground freezes and when evening temperatures average between 40° to 50° F. 2. Prepare the planting bed by digging the soil so it's loose and workable.  You may want to add organic matter such as compost or peat moss to the bed. 3. Plant the pointy end of the bulb up. 4. Plant big bulbs about 8" deep and small bulbs about 5" deep. 5. Plant bulbs in clusters. A lone tulip or daffodil can look funny. 6. If you are planting bulbs that bloom at the same time, plant low bulbs in front of high. So before the temperature falls too low, get out there and enjoy your garden. In about six months your garden will put on a spectacular spring show.





Posted by Eliane Consalvo on 6/28/2015

You've just bought a house…or maybe you're about to sell one. You look around your property and realize it's less than attractive. The grass is patchy and yellowed in some areas; the shrubs that came with the property look overgrown or spindly; and there's no color anywhere. So how do you go about making your yard an inviting oasis--a place that you or a potential buyer would like to spend time in? You start with the base--the soil. An inexpensive home soil test kit will tell you if your soil is too acidic or alkaline. Depending on the results, you can add a lime or a sulphur mixture to obtain the correct pH. Another factor is your soil's composition and texture. The best soil has the perfect proportions of clay, silt and sand and has some organic components as well. If your soil is so dense you can barely get a spade into it, you need to to loosen it up with a good hand tool and some loam. Loam is basically "perfect soil", with the correct proportions of sand, clay and silt. Loam is available at your local landscape supply business and is sold by the cubic yard. You can mix it into your existing soil or--if your soil is very poor and rocky (as is often the case here in New England), you can remove it and replace it with loam. The other important component of soil--especially if you plan on planting flowers and/or vegetables is organic nutrients. There are two ways to enrich your soil: on the surface and in the soil itself. The best way to add nutrients from the inside out is with compost, which is organic material that has been partially broken down. Old-fashioned composting takes time and work. You need a bin, lots of organic material (leftover food, leaves, grass clippings, etc.), time for the material to break down and someone willing to turn the compost frequently (mixing it up). There is an easier method, however: recycling yard waste. Many landscape suppliers will take your branches, limbs and clippings and turn them into compost for you. Typically, you drop off your yard waste and drive off with someone else's that's already been turned into compost--everyone benefits. Once the soil is good, you can then go onto to the fun part--choosing and planting flowers, shrubs and trees.




Categories: Yard Improvements