Eliane Consalvo - LAER Realty Partners



Posted by Eliane Consalvo on 4/1/2018

Cleaning. Itís not an activity we are all particularly enthusiastic to partake in, yet is a very necessary one. After investing in a new home you want to make it maintain its value over time by keeping it in tip top shape. However, life happens and as days become weeks and weeks become months itís easy to get caught up in the flow of life and forget those once in awhile cleaning tasks that need to be done throughout the year. Never forget another cleaning task again by creating a seasonal cleaning calendar. For best results combine your everyday calendar with your cleaning one so you have everything at a glance. Spring

  • Inspect roof for any damage that could have occurred from the harsh Winter weather.
  • Look for any other Winter related damage around the parameters of your house.
  • Scrape, sand, prime and/or paint any spots around the home that need it.
  • Clear out lawn and garden beds from any debris to make way for new growth.
  • Plan out your Spring and Summer planting, gardening and landscaping projects.
  • Sort through winter clothes before storing them for the season. Donate any items your children may have outgrown and repair anything that needs mending.
  • Clean your home top to bottom by wiping down ceilings, walls and baseboards.
  • Vacuum and wipe down window panes and sills.
  • Consider holding a yard sale to get rid of any extra clutter that may have gathered over the year.
  • Deep clean the carpets in your home.
  • Clean out the inside of your fridge and vacuum the coils on the back.
  • Test all smoke detectors.
  • Have your air conditioner serviced before the hot weather hits.
  • Pressure wash your house and garage siding as well as your driveway.
Summer
  • Spray insecticides and bug repellants.
  • Inspect fire extinguishers and purchase some if you do not already own any.
  • Flip and rotate mattresses and couch cushions.
  • Regularly prune trees and shrubs.
  • Drain and/or flush your water heater.
Fall
  • Clean all patio furniture before storing it for the winter.
  • Touch up any paint that may be peeling and worn from the Summer heat.
  • Check seals on windows and doors as well as caulking. Make sure your home is well-sealed to prevent any energy leaks over the Winter months.
  • Clean out the gutters along your home.
  • If your home has chimneys have them professionally inspected and cleaned.
  • Schedule a furnace inspection before the cold weather hits.
  • Take the time to clean and organize your kitchen to prepare for holiday cooking.
  • Test and replace batteries in fire alarms.
  • Rake up leaves to prevent debris buildup.
  • Install storm windows to prepare for colder weather.
  • Clean and organize your attic and/or basement.
  • Sort through your family'sí Summer clothes before storing them for the†season. Donate any your children have outgrown and repair any that need mending.
Winter
  • Change your furnaceís filters throughout the season as needed.
  • Check the grout around your home and repair as needed
  • Program your thermostat for maximum energy savings.
  • Schedule a termite inspection.
  • Clean out the vents to your dryer.
  • Before packing holiday decorations up for the year ensure they are clean, organized and in working order.
While cleaning may or may not be your favorite activity it is one that must be done throughout the year. Creating a seasonal cleaning calendar will help to keep these tasks at the forefront of your mind and your home in prime condition. At the end of the year you will have a well-maintained home and can feel good about the hard work you put in to make your house and clean, and welcoming home!





Posted by Eliane Consalvo on 4/9/2017

If you have a list of home contractors that you use and are satisfied with, consider your yourself lucky!

Many homeowners find themselves in the unenviable position of having to blindly search online for reputable contractors, sort their way through dozens of miscellaneous reviews, and then hopefully find a handful of promising candidates to interview.

Even after all that, there's no guarantee you'll be 100% satisfied with your choice!

Although picking a contractor may sometimes feel like a gamble, there are strategies for lowering your risk factor.

A personal recommendation from someone you know and trust is usually the most reliable method of finding the right person for the job. If a relative or friend has had a positive experience with a roofer, bathroom remodeler, or plumber, then there's a good chance, you'll be satisfied with them, too. It's still a good idea to get two or three contractor estimates, but a good starting point is to have at least one recommendation from someone who has your best interest at heart.

Do Online Reviews Help?

Online review sites can also provide helpful information and feedback, but they're not always the "unvarnished truth". In spite of efforts by review sites to discourage biased reviews, some are probably going to slip through. For example: Have you ever read a review that sounded like it was an advertisement for the contractor? Sometimes when the praise sounds just a little too glowing and over the top, you can't help but wonder if those reviews are genuine and unbiased. Although the majority of online reviews are probably legit, the best way to view them is with a healthy dose of skepticism.

When it comes to the occasional scathing review by a disgruntled customer, one has to put it in context and look at "the big picture." There are some customers who are literally impossible to satisfy and will always find something to complain about. However, if a contractor has more than one or two negative reviews online, and they're not offset by a couple dozen positive ones, then that could be a potential red flag. Since you don't know the reviewers personally, and the reviews are often posted anonymously, the credibility factor is much lower than if you got a recommendation from one of your parents, a close friend, a next-door neighbor, a sibling, business associate, or your real estate agent.

The point at which you should be able to separate the "wheat from the chaff" is during your face-to-face meetings. If a contractor gives every you indication of being professional, honest, knowledgeable, experienced, ethical, and customer-service oriented, then they're probably a good prospect for the job. Other factors include the price they quote, their Better Business Bureau rating, and their willingness to provide references, proof of insurance coverage (such as general liability and Workers' Comp, if applicable) and direct answers to all your questions